“What I Wish I Knew Before Couponing” is Available Now in the Amazon Store!

The book is here and for sale in the Kindle store! “What I Wish I Knew Before Couponing” is ready for sale and is only $2.99. In this 105-page edition you’ll learn the 55 money-costing mistakes all couponers make, but they’re not aware they’re making them! I’m guilty of these offenses, but hopefully by reading this book you won’t make them yourself.

Learn from the common and not-so-common mistakes, including:

  • Organizing improperly
  • Burning out
  • Buying useless subscriptions
  • Not using free apps that give you money for shopping
  • …and more!

I want to thank everyone for purchasing my first book “How to Coupon: One Cheap Utah Chick’s Guide to Getting Started” and hope you all will enjoy this one too!

Right now it’s only available on Kindle, but next week it will publish to Barnes & Noble Nook, Apple iBookstore, and as a PDF online! You don’t need a Kindle to read this right now though. You can access the Kindle app from a variety of devices (including the iPhone!) by clicking here.

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Poll: Do You Go Thru Products Faster with a Stockpile?

It’s time for a poll! How many of you notice you go through a stockpile faster because you know it’s there? It’s a subconscious thing — if you know you have extra or more on hand you aren’t as conservative using the product (and potentially waste more). I ask because I have noticed myself doing this from time to time. While I’m not a wasteful person, I do seem to go through stuff faster since I know I have extra, but there are times it might be in my head. So, why not poll everyone and see what you all think? Fill out the poll and let’s see!

Do You Go Through Stuff Faster Because You Have More in the Stockpile?

Store Policies – Do They Matter?

There are a lot of couponers that ignore store policies — I was one of those too. But, if you’re a couponer store policies are very important. These guide you on how many coupons you can use, the types of coupons accepted and how overages are applied. We are going to discuss a few basics here today, but also I’ll link you to a few popular stores and their policies so that you can print and keep them nearby.

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Couponing Myths: You Only Get Junk Food with Coupons (Myth 3)

canstockphoto12483793It’s time to continue the series and debunk yet another myth about coupons. A lot of shoppers avoid store coupons and online coupons because they assume that all they can buy with those coupons is junk food. Yes, there are tons of junk food or processed food item coupons out there, but that’s not all there is.

Coupons for Healthy Food

There are tons of coupons for healthy food — you just have to actually look. Online printable coupons, like Coupons.com or RedPlum.com have dozens of coupons on healthy stuff. Store coupons do too! Smith’s for example, has coupons for organic food items, like Simply Organic. I load these to my store loyalty card and wait for a sale.

You Can’t Get Free, Healthy Foods with Coupons

This is nonsense. I get free healthy foods with coupons all the time. Just the other day I got a free watermelon and gallon of milk. It is possible! Plus, you can always use your overages for free healthy foods.

To get cheap healthy foods you need to look out for them. Stores pack their advertisements and coupon inserts with junk food, but there are just as many healthy food coupons out there too. Also, a lot of stores don’t advertise the healthy food sales, but there are still killer deals. Whole Foods also has tons of sales and printable coupons that help you walk away with vegetarian-friendly, vegan-friendly and organic foods for over 80% off.

Sorry to burst the negativity bubble! But this myth is most definitely untrue.

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See more from this series:

Couponing Myths: Stores Lose Money by Accepting Coupons (Myth 1)
C
ouponing Myths: Low Value Coupons Aren’t Worth the Time (Myth 2)

Couponing Myths: Low Value Coupons Aren’t Worth the Time (Myth 2)

canstockphoto12483793A lot of shoppers skip over the low value coupons — $0.25, $0.50, etc. They assume that since they only shave off a quarter (or two) they’re not worth the time to clip and use. This couponing myth is easily debunked. Why? Because when you pair those low value coupons with the right sale, you can get products fairly cheap — sometimes free.

For example, Pampers releases a $0.50/1 Pampers Wipes coupon a few times per year (in the Proctor & Gamble insert). The cheapest I can find wipes (regular price) is $1.97 at Walmart. So when you use that coupon, it doesn’t do much. But, when these same wipes go on sale at Smith’s (usually in their Buy 10, Save $10 sale), they’re $0.99 each. With that coupon I get baby wipes for $0.49!

If it’s a product you’ll use and need, clip those low value coupons. While they may not dent a regular-priced item, they sure make a difference come sale time.

See more from this series:

Couponing Myths: Stores Lose Money by Accepting Coupons (Myth 1)

10 Things You Can Always Get Free with Coupons

PrintI have had a lot of people ask me what is a good deal, what’s rock bottom, couponing tips, and what they can get for free. Determining the “rock bottom” price means you need to track prices in your area. One location’s rock bottom varies greatly from another. For example, here in Utah my rock bottom is about $0.25 to $1.00 higher than the rock bottom price people can get in states that double coupons.

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Couponing Myths: Stores Lose Money by Accepting Coupons (Myth 1)

canstockphoto12483793

There are plenty of couponing myths out there. Some have a touch of truth to them, for sure, but the majority are false. This series will focus on all of those couponing myths and debunk them or at least shine a little light on the them so you can see where these myths have gotten out of hand. Even if you’re just looking for a little couponing 101, understanding these myths is important. A lot of these myths lead couponers to skip over valuable savings or not use coupons at all. This series will continue on debunking each myth I discover.

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